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THE MOSQUITO – ONE MORE ENEMY THAT THE MEN AND WOMEN OF THE UNITED STATES MILITARY BATTLED … AND CONTINUE TO BATTLE

(Image credit: Homes for Heroes)

ohDEER is the leader in all-natural deer, mosquito, and tick control.

We were founded in 2007, in Wayland, MA, the town in which our home office has always been located. Through this office, and our growing franchise network, we provide service to all of Massachusetts, including the islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket; the eastern section of Long Island in New York State; and central New Jersey.

On Veterans Day, it is most appropriate to mention and cite, as we have done before in this space, that Wayland, MA is located within a historical hotbed geography of revolutionary fighting and fervor that launched the United States of America.  

Mentioned in the post is that residents of a place that is present-day Wayland fought in the colonies’ battle for independence.

Of course, the legacy of the American soldier, from 1775 to 2o19, is one that is heavy with a foe that ohDEER knows full well, and which is, at its mildest and least consequential, a nuisance and bother – and which, at its most serious, can be deadly.

We are talking about the mosquito (Culicidae).

Around the world, whether or not in combat zones, during times of war and peace, and in places guns were firing or silent, U.S. Armed Forces personnel have had to contend with the mosquito and diseases it spreads.

World War II U.S. anti-malaria poster (image credit: Office of War Information)

Consider this excerpt from a story, “The Other Foe: The U.S. Army’s Fight Against Malaria in the Pacific Theater, 1942-5,” written by Seth Paltzer, and published on April 30, 2016, on the website of the Army Historical Foundation:

“The average soldier serving in the Pacific Theater of Operations (PTO) fighting against the Japanese faced a great many challenges and dangers.  Often overlooked by histories of the war, one of the most insidious of these was malaria. This disease, while not typically fatal to the infected soldier, would take him out of action for a prolonged period just as surely as if he had been wounded in battle.  The Army’s fight against malaria is a fascinating story of man versus nature, with America’s success in the war against Japan at stake.”

Indeed, Uncle Sam keeps front and center on its radar screen the mosquito as an enemy of the military, and has committed considerable resources to battling mosquitoes.  Among these efforts is the invention of the U.S. Army which is chronicled and explained in a U.S. Army Public Health Command story, “Army inventions helps prevent mosquito borne disease,” published on May 30, 2014.

Please click here to be taken to the story which was written by Jane Gervasoni.

And, just to think, in our society, one in which is common and ordinary and widespread not to reflect on martial sacrifice and giving, that, even we do commit this most appropriate dedication of thought to military service and what it entails, the effect of the mosquito is rarely considered.

Well, the mosquito is one more hardship that the U.S. soldier has and continues to confront.

ohDEER extends a thank you to all who have work the uniform – and who have stood, and are standing now, to protect freedom and safeguard liberty.