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Of Pandemic, Deer, Mosquitoes, Ticks – and Of People Living and Persevering During a Time of Great and Historic Trial

First off, let’s be ever mindful and aware that the worst of it – the worst of the sweep of the pandemic – is the immense loss of life and property and fortune it has caused.   We cannot be best prepared for the next disease epidemic – and there will be a next disease epidemic – if we lose sight of the enormity of the awful.

And, of course, COVID-19 has had consequence for almost all aspects of existence.

Does the pandemic tie in and have any relevance to the day-in-and-day-out adversaries of ohDEER, and the business of ohDEER?

Yes, we are talking about deer, mosquitoes, and ticks – and our mission to keep them away from the property on which sit homes and businesses.

Let’s discuss all this, and start out whether the blood-sucking pests – mosquitoes and ticks – can give us coronavirus.

The best scientific and health expert information tells us that mosquitoes and ticks are not a significant threat as a transmitter to humans of COVID-19.

That’ not to say that there is no threat.  After all, the experts tell us that COVID-19 first originated in animals, probably a bat.

As well – even absent being a spreader of the COVID-19 –mosquitoes and ticks are already serious health threats in the geographic regions where ohDEER does business: all of Massachusetts including Cape Cod and the Islands; the eastern section of Long Island, NY; and Central New Jersey.

For in this region, mosquitoes can infect people with eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and West Nile virus (WNV), and ticks can infect people with, most commonly. Lyme diseasebabesiosis, and anaplasmosis … and also, but rarely, with Rocky Mountain spotted feverBorrelia miyamotoiPowassan virus, and tularemia.

All these diseases can make people very sick, and in some cases can be life threatening.

It is always a good thing to keep our distance from mosquitoes and ticks.

To read an informative and helpful article about mosquitoes and ticks, and COVID-19, please click here to be taken to a story, “Can ticks and mosquitoes transmit the coronavirus?  No, but use good judgment in avoiding bites from mosquitoes and ticks,” published on March 20, 2020 in AgriLife Today, a publication of Texas A&M University.  Author of the piece is Laura Muntean.

Now, as for deer and the pandemic.  Deer can surely contract types of coronavirus.  Although the COVID-19 coronavirus has not been detected in deer

And, actually – and here we refer to the five tigers in the Bronx Zoo who came down with COVID-19, none of whom are seriously ill, and all expected to fully recover – they most likely caught the virus from a zoo employee, which suggests that … just maybe … the risk could be higher of humans spreading the pandemic to deer rather than vice versa.   Then, again, deer practice social distancing in their relationship with people.

Curiously, the slowdown of the economy, and the major reduction in auto traffic and people out and about, have encouraged deer to venture even more frequently into our developed civilization.   The pace of life is picking up a bit –but it still is significantly less busy and less crowded than it was pre-COVID-19.

More deer in more places results in more opportunity for deer to transport ticks – and more opportunity for deer to damage landscapes with their munching of shrubs and flowers and bushes, and their rubbing of antlers and foreheads on trees.

America … the world … continues to heal and battle and get a hold of what the virus has caused, causes, and threatens.

And ohDEER takes inventory and is thankful for its good fortune, connected directly to people increasing the time they spend at home during this extraordinary and historic episode, which has resulted in our company staying busy … indeed, we have become busier … as families invest more in creating spaces and yards of recreation and relaxation.

Society becomes stronger and grows its resilience.

ohDEER is gratified and inspired to play its modest role in supporting people getting on with living, and securing and nurturing smiles and happiness.